Just trying to be virtuous?

START A REVOLUTION WITH ME   SUBMIT A REVOLUTION   Hello, my name is Sarah! Okay, so I'm super new at this but I really just love all things French Revolution. I'm using this blog to navigate my way through learning about it. Please be forgiving if I make mistakes! I just want to educate and be educated.

"Oh! que cette joie me faisait mal ! J’étais tout à la fois satisfait et mécontent ; je disais tant mieux et tant pis. Je comprends que le peuple se fasse justice, j’approuve cette justice lorsqu’elle est satisfaite par l’anéantissement des coupables, mais pourrait-elle aujourd’hui n’être pas cruelle ? Les supplices de tous genres, l’écartèlement, la torture, la roue, les bûchers, le fouet, les gibets, les bourreaux multipliés partout, nous ont fait de si mauvaises moeurs ! Les maîtres, au lieu de nous policer, nous ont rendus barbares, parce qu’ils le sont eux-mêmes. Ils récoltent et récolteront ce qu’ils ont semé, car tout cela, ma pauvre amie, aura, à ce qu’il paraît, des suites terribles."

Babeuf, lettre écrite à sa femme après le 14 juillet.

He got it. He got it so well.

(via apocalypse-revolutionnaire)

(via needsmoreresearch)

— 2 months ago with 18 notes

history meme | ten moments; the french revolution (1789-1799)

The absolute monarchy that had ruled France for centuries collapsed within three years. French society underwent a dramatic transformation, as feudal, aristocratic and religious privileges evaporated under a sustained assault from radical left-wing political groups, masses on the streets, and peasants in the countryside. Old ideas about tradition and hierarchy regarding monarchs, aristocrats, and the Catholic Church were abruptly overthrown by new principles o liberty, equality and fraternity. The modern era has unfolded in the shadow of the French Revolution. The growth of republics and liberal democracies, the spread of secularism, the development of modern ideologies, and the invention of total war all mark their birth during the Revolution. {X}

(via snugglejolras-deactivated201404)

— 10 months ago with 1891 notes

thelegendends:

HISTORY MEME - FRANCE VERSION ♛ [05/10] moments : Storming of the Bastille (14 july 1784)

On the morning of 14 July 1789, the city of Paris was in a state of alarm. The demonstrators, led by Amaria Cahila, of the Third Estate in France, had earlier stormed the Hôtel des Invalides to gather arms and were mainly seeking to acquire the large quantities of arms and ammunition stored at the Bastille. At this point, the Bastille was nearly empty of prisoners, housing only seven old men annoyed by all the disturbance : four forgers, two “lunatics” and one “deviant” aristocrat, the Comte de Solages. The cost of maintaining a medieval fortress and garrison for so limited a purpose had led to a decision being taken to close it, shortly before the disturbances began. It was, however, a symbol of royal tyranny. The crowd gathered outside around mid-morning, calling for the surrender of the prison, the removal of the guns and the release of the arms and gunpowder. Two representatives of the crowd outside were invited into the fortress and negotiations began, and another was admitted around noon with definite demands. The negotiations dragged on while the crowd grew and became impatient. Around 13:30 the crowd surged into the undefended outer courtyard, and the chains on the drawbridge to the inner courtyard were cut, crushing one unfortunate vainqueur. About this time gunfire began, though some stories state that the Governor had a cannon fire into the crowd killing several women, children, and men turning the crowd into a mob. The crowd seemed to have felt it had been drawn into a trap and the fighting became more violent and intense, while attempts by deputies to organise a cease-fire were ignored by the attackers. The firing continued, and at 15:00 the attackers were reinforced by mutinous gardes françaises and other deserters from among the regular troops, along with two cannons. A substantial force of Royal Army troops encamped on the nearby Champs de Mars did not intervene. With the possibility of a mutual massacre suddenly apparent Governor de Launay ordered a cease fire at 17:00. A letter offering his terms was handed out to the besiegers through a gap in the inner gate. His demands were refused, but de Launay nonetheless capitulated, as he realised that his troops could not hold out much longer; he opened the gates to the inner courtyard, and the vainqueurs swept in to liberate the fortress at 17:30.

More. [x]

— 10 months ago with 330 notes
vivelareine:

An anecdote about Marie Antoinette and her son, Louis Charles, in the Temple prison:

While the royal family was imprisoned and closely guarded in the Temple, the revolutionaries discovered an iron coffer in one of the rooms, a fact they considered highly suspect, giving rise to endless rumors and inquiries.
One day, while the prisoners were dining under their guards’ watchful eyes, the Dauphin saw a biscuit on the table, became interested in it and said to his mother:
“Here is a wonderful biscuit. Mother, if you permit me, I know of a coffer where I can lock it up securely.”
Apprehensive because of the reference to a coffer—which the guards could consider damning—the Queen looked around the room, searching for a coffer, while the revolutionaries attentively watched her every movement, fearing some sort of plot. The Queen finally said:
“My son, I don’t see the coffer you’re talking about.”
Pointing to his own mouth, the Dauphin said: “Here is the access to it.”

source: nobility.org

vivelareine:

An anecdote about Marie Antoinette and her son, Louis Charles, in the Temple prison:

While the royal family was imprisoned and closely guarded in the Temple, the revolutionaries discovered an iron coffer in one of the rooms, a fact they considered highly suspect, giving rise to endless rumors and inquiries.

One day, while the prisoners were dining under their guards’ watchful eyes, the Dauphin saw a biscuit on the table, became interested in it and said to his mother:

“Here is a wonderful biscuit. Mother, if you permit me, I know of a coffer where I can lock it up securely.”

Apprehensive because of the reference to a coffer—which the guards could consider damning—the Queen looked around the room, searching for a coffer, while the revolutionaries attentively watched her every movement, fearing some sort of plot. The Queen finally said:

“My son, I don’t see the coffer you’re talking about.”

Pointing to his own mouth, the Dauphin said: “Here is the access to it.”

source: nobility.org

— 10 months ago with 63 notes

History meme » nine kings/queens - Marie Antoinette [2/9]

(via bunniesandbeheadings)

— 10 months ago with 130 notes

These illustrations of Louis XVI and Marie-Antoinette, taken from the Artist’s Edition of Carlyle’s French Revolution (1893), show us the “king with a large jaw” and the “queen with fair face” of France.

Source

(Source: sadnessdollart, via bunniesandbeheadings)

— 10 months ago with 32 notes

isitjuicy:

These pages are dotted through the French sections of “An Illustrated History of Modern Europe 1789-1945” by Denis Richards (fifth edition, 1950).  From the preface:

Illustrations
These have been included partly with the idea of making pupils feel more ‘friendly’ towards their text-book, and partly with the idea of aiding the memory.  […]  The picture-charts are summaries of movements or causes of great importance, presented in this way to assist the memory of the many students best approached through the visual sense.

(via needsmoreresearch)

— 10 months ago with 35 notes
#I dig this 

history memeone war {French Revolution}

French Revolution (1789–1799), was a period of radical social and political upheaval in France that had a lasting impact on French history and more broadly throughout Europe. The absolute monarchy that had ruled France for centuries collapsed within three years. French society underwent an epic transformation, as feudal, aristocratic and religious privileges evaporated under a sustained assault from radical left-wing political groups, masses on the streets, and peasants in the countryside.[1] Old ideas about tradition and hierarchy regarding monarchs, aristocrats, and the Catholic Church were abruptly overthrown by new principles of Liberté, égalité, fraternité (liberty, equality and fraternity). The royal houses across Europe were horrified and led a countercrusade that by 1814 had restored the old monarchy, but many major reforms became permanent. So too did antagonisms between the supporters and enemies of the Revolution, who fought it out politically over the next two centuries.

(Source: rumplestitlskin, via bunniesandbeheadings)

— 10 months ago with 1048 notes
Ultime discours du citoyen Robespierre - Discours à la Convention : séance du 8 thermidor an II (26 juillet 1794)

josephine-and-jewelry:

En voyant la multitude des vices que le torrent de la Révolution a roulés pêle-mêle avec les vertus civiques, j’ai tremblé quelquefois d’être souillé aux yeux de la postérité par le voisinage impur de ces hommes pervers qui se mêlaient dans les rangs des défenseurs sincères de l’humanité; mais la défaite des factions rivales a comme émancipé tous les vices; ils ont cru qu’il ne s’agissait plus pour eux que de partager la patrie comme un butin, au lieu de la rendre libre et prospère ; et je les remercie de ce que la fureur dont ils sont animés contre tout ce qui s’oppose à leurs projets a tracé la ligne de démarcation entre eux et tous les gens de bien. Mais si les Verres et les Catilina de la France se croient déjà assez avancés dans la carrière du crime pour exposer sur la tribune aux harangues la tête de leur accusateur, j’ai promis aussi naguère de laisser à mes concitoyens un testament redoutable aux oppresseurs du peuple, et je leur lègue dès ce moment l’opprobre et la mort ! Je conçois qu’il est facile à la ligue des tyrans du monde d’accabler un seul homme ; mais je sais aussi quels sont les devoirs d’un homme qui peut mourir en défendant la cause du genre humain. 

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— 10 months ago with 11 notes